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14.3.2. Exercise Types

Solfege's exercises are arranged in six broad categories:
  • Intervals, which tests your ability to perceive and identify melodic and harmonic intervals.
  • Rhythm, which tests your ability to perceive and notate rhythms played with a single pitch, and to perform such a rhythm by means of tapping on the keyboard.
  • Theory, which tests your ability to name written intervals and scales, and to correctly use solfa syllables.
  • Chords, which tests your ability to perceive and identify chords built from various intervals, played at various pitch levels, and to sing such a chord.
  • Scales, which tests your ability to perceive and identify scales and their modes.
  • Miscellaneous, which includes a variety of exercises, including:
    • Intonation, which tests your ability to perceive and identify whether a second pitch is lower or higher than it should be.
    • Dictation, which tests your ability to perceive and notate melodies.
    • Identify Tone, which tests your ability to use relative pitch (see Relative Pitch (Wikipedia) at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_pitch for more information).
    • Sing Twelve Random Tones, which tests many skills.
    • Beats per Minute, which tests your ability to determine a tempo.
    • Harmonic Progressions, which tests your ability to perceive and apply Roman numeral chord symbols for a series of chords played together.
    • Hear Tones, which helps you to train for relative pitch.
    • Cadences, which tests your ability to perceive and apply Roman numeral chord symbols for two chords played together.
All of these exercises require the use of your aural skills outside an actual musical situation. This may seem fruitless, but it has long been recognized as an important part of the eventual ability to hear them within a musical context. Neither ability will suddenly appear; it will take dedicated practice.