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Part I. Linux Audio Basics

Table of Contents

1. Sound Cards and Digital Audio
1.1. Types of Sound Cards
1.1.1. Audio Interfaces
1.1.2. MIDI Interfaces
1.2. Sound Card Connections
1.2.1. Integrated into the Motherboard
1.2.2. Internal PCI Connection
1.2.3. External FireWire Connection
1.2.4. External USB Connection
1.2.5. Choosing a Connection Type
1.3. Sample, Sample Rate, Sample Format, and Bit Rate
1.3.1. Sample
1.3.2. Sample Format
1.3.3. Sample Rate
1.3.4. Bit Rate
1.3.5. Conclusions
1.4. Other Digital Audio Concepts
1.4.1. MIDI Sequencer
1.4.2. Busses, Master Bus, and Sub-Master Bus
1.4.3. Level (Volume/Loudness)
1.4.4. Panning and Balance
1.4.5. Time, Timeline, and Time-Shifting
1.4.6. Synchronization
1.4.7. Routing and Multiplexing
1.4.8. Multichannel Audio
2. Software for Sound Cards
2.1. How Linux Deals with Audio Hardware
2.2. Sound Servers
2.2.1. PulseAudio
2.2.2. JACK Audio Connection Kit
2.2.3. Phonon
2.3. Use the JACK Audio Connection Kit
2.3.1. Install and Configure JACK
2.3.2. Using QjackCtl
2.3.3. Integrating PulseAudio with JACK
3. Real-Time and Low Latency
3.1. Why Low Latency Is Desirable
3.2. Processor Scheduling
3.3. The Real-Time Linux Kernel
3.4. Hard and Soft Real-Time
3.5. Getting a Real-Time Kernel in Fedora Linux
4. Planet CCRMA at Home
4.1. About Planet CCRMA at Home
4.2. Deciding Whether to Use Planet CCRMA at Home
4.2.1. Exclusive Software
4.2.2. Security and Stability
4.2.3. A Possible "Best Practices" Solution
4.3. Using Software from Planet CCRMA at Home
4.3.1. Installing the Planet CCRMA at Home Repositories
4.3.2. Set Repository Priorities
4.3.3. Prevent a Package from Being Updated