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Options when removing packages

The --allmatches option tells the rpm command to remove all packages with names that match the names you pass on the command line. If you do not use the --allmatches option, the rpm command will issue an error if more than one package matches the name or names you pass on the command line.
The --nodeps option tells the rpm command to skip the test of dependencies. Use this option when you really, really, want to uninstall a package.

Unsafe Commands

Using any option that does not perform the full removal of the package, or skips some of the checks built into the rpm command, can result in damage to your Linux system. Use these options with care.
The --repackage option, described previously, tells the rpm command to create a package, an RPM file, from any packages it would erase. These packages will appear in the default repackage directory, which is normally /var/spool/repackage/. Check your RPM settings to be sure of the directory configured on your system.

Repackaged Files

Packages created with the --repackage option are not full packages. You cannot install these packages.
Similar to the options when installing or upgrading packages, you can use the --noscripts and --notriggers options when removing packages. The --noscripts option tells the rpm command not to run any uninstallation scripts. You can refine this by using either --nopreun or --nopostun in place of the --noscripts option.
The --nopreun option tells the rpm command not to run the pre-uninstallation scripts. The --nopostun option tells the rpm command not to run the post-uninstallation scripts.
The --notriggers option works in a similar fashion. The --notriggers option tells the rpm command not to execute any triggers. For a finer grain of control, use --notriggerun to prevent any uninstallation triggers and --notriggerpostun to prevent any post-uninstallation triggers.