System Utilities

Unit names in systemd messages

Messages printed by systemd to the console and the journal now have a different default format that displays the unit name, using the combined formatting mode as opposed to the previous default of description.

The previous format, description, printed messages such as these:

Started Journal Service.
Finished Load Kernel Modules.
Starting Apply Kernel Variables...
Starting Create Volatile Files and Directories...
Finished Apply Kernel Variables.
Finished Create Volatile Files and Directories.
Finished Setup Virtual Console.
Starting dracut ask for additional cmdline parameters...
Finished dracut ask for additional cmdline parameters.
Starting dracut cmdline hook...

Now, with the new default, the same messages will look like the following instead:

Started systemd-journald.service - Journal Service.
Finished systemd-modules-load.service - Load Kernel Modules.
Finished systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service - Create Static Device Nodes in /dev.
Starting systemd-sysctl.service - Apply Kernel Variables...
Starting systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service - Create Volatile Files and Directories...
Finished systemd-sysctl.service - Apply Kernel Variables.
Finished systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service - Create Volatile Files and Directories.
Finished systemd-vconsole-setup.service - Setup Virtual Console.
Starting dracut-cmdline-ask.service - dracut ask for additional cmdline parameters...
Finished dracut-cmdline-ask.service - dracut ask for additional cmdline parameters.
Starting dracut-cmdline.service - dracut cmdline hook...

If you don’t like the new default, you can use systemd.status-unit-format=name|description to override the default. You can also use bootctl systemd-efi-options systemd.status-unit-format=name|description on EFI systems, and to create a config file with [Manager] StatusUnitFormat=name|description to pick a different setting.

New script for removing retired packages

Previously, when a package retired from Fedora has been removed from the repositories, it remained installed on a your computer. Such packages never receive an update, security or otherwise, making them a potential risk. Fedora now provides the package remove-retired-packages which allows you to remove these retired packages. Running the tool will search your system for packages that have been removed in the previous release, and suggest them for removal one at a time, allowing you to choose whether to remove or not for each package separately. Alternatively, you can supply an older release number to search for packages retired earlier - for example, remove-retired-packages 32 will find all packages retired since Fedora 32.

System upgrade documentation has been amended with this information as well.

PostgreSQL 14

Fedora 36 provides the latest stable version of postgresql and libpq packages in version 14.

For more details about this release, see the official PostgreSQL release notes.